Life and Debt — the Documentary

There is a fountain of information found at the local libraries.  Not everything need come from the internet, nor do we have to pay for every movie we want to watch.

Today, I found this gem-of-a-movie at the library — and got to watch it for free.  The documentary is called Life and Debt, and is based on the economic problems in Jamaica that started after the British left. It’s a fascinating movie, and I was saddened by the series of events and the situation the country is in.

It’s very well done, and the link I provided gives you tons of information about the movie, so I will not elaborate further.

To your prosperity,

Sue

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The Olympic ticket scam

I personally do not have television access, and for the most part, don’t really miss it.  I wasn’t aware of the Olympic ticket scam that has been happening, and just came across this article the other day.

Should I be surprised by scammers taking advantage of others at such a high profile event such as this?  I probably shouldn’t be, but I am.  I still am.

I’m not a huge sports and athletics fan, yet I have attended the Commonwealth games when they were in my city.  The winter Olympics happened to also be in a city that was close to me, and I did not make the effort to attend — probably because it was too expensive, too difficult to find a place to stay, didn’t want to stand out in the cold to watch events, etc.  Just my preference.  Yet, I do have compassion for those who were duped by at least one website, especially if they were booking events that their own children were participating in.  That would be devastating, on many levels, and the article mentions that there is very little, from a legal perspective, that can be done about it.  That, I don’t understand.

My wish is that those who were scammed still get to attend the events they booked themselves for.  I don’t know how this can happen though, and who would facilitate this.  However, it is still my wish.

To your prosperity,

Sue

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Wednesday, August 6th, 2008 Money & Sports, Money & The Law No Comments

The practice of “wombs for rent”

I happened to come across an article today about a baby born to a surrogate mother.  The baby’s parents have divorced, and live in another country, so the status of where the baby is to go is in limbo.  Apparently, India’s laws state that a baby girl cannot live with a single dad.

It’s the end of the article that helped me decide to include the article in this blog.  Here is a quote from that article:

Surrogate mothers in Anand charge about 100,000 rupees (2,500 dollars) for a pregnancy and have been approached by a number of overseas Indian and foreign couples who can have a surrogate baby at a fraction of the cost in Western countries.

Surrogate mothers are often poor women who opt to carry a stranger’s baby to help pay education and housing costs for their own families.

Through my research process for the book, I’m discovering so many ways that people choose to generate an income, and as a woman, I don’t think I could go this route.  I guess when one is placed in certain positions, perhaps the choices become easier?  I don’t know.

To your prosperity,

Sue

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Credit cards and hacking the internet

I have a technology background and was an adult educator in that field.  One day, one of  my students/users asked me a question about how viruses are made, how hackers get into systems, etc., and I remember answering, “I don’t know — my mind doesn’t go there, so I’ve never had a desire to learn how to do that.”

This recent article is about how 11 people were charged with conspiracy, computer intrusion, fraud and identity theft after 41 million credit card numbers were hacked.  Some of the numbers were sold, and some of them were used by the hackers.

In my email box today, I received an article embedded in a techie-type newsletter that said that there’s a web page infected every 5 seconds on the web.  The websites affected are mostly business sites or the social networks.

I would love to see all that brain power that is focused on mischief and theft go towards helping society, and reclaiming the health of our bodies and our planet.

To your prosperity,

Sue

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Tuesday, August 5th, 2008 Money & Credit, Money & The Internet No Comments

Sick People Going to Work

I recently ended a job working for a “big box” retailer in a little town.  Prior to this, I had never worked for an employer that hadn’t paid for sick time.  This particular retailer had us earning sick time, based on the hours worked, however, the first day of any sickness was not a “paid” day off.  During my 7 1/2 months of employment, I did get ill a couple of times — one illness lasted 16 days straight.  Out of those sixteen days, I was actually away from my workplace for 3 days in total.  It happened to be a viral illness that couldn’t be treated with medication, and fluids and rest would have eased the symptoms significantly.  Luckily, I had a few weekends in that span of time to do some recuperating, but ultimately, if I hadn’t had to go to work, would the illness have lasted so long?

Going to work ill was not a great experience — not for me and certainly not for the customers and the staff I worked with.  So, why did I do it?  Ummm…for the money?  Of course.  On my meager wage, I could barely pay my bills, let alone have a “buffer” to create an “emergency fund.”  So, if my employer couldn’t support me while I was ill, who else would?

This article spurred my interest in writing about the topic today because it lets me know I am not alone.  In whose best interest is it that an employee go to work sick?  Nobodies.

To your health AND prosperity.

Sue

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