Money & Shelter

Marianne Williamson and Poverty

I just received a brief newsletter from Marianne Williamson, and I love the information she is bringing forth from her recent experiences in the slums of Kenya.  Please click on the link below to access:

http://blog.marianne.com/journal/archives/2010/04/from_the_middle.php

Housing prices and relationships

When I read this article yesterday, by a Wall Street Journal writer who was trying to sell his home, I was reminded of my own situation over ten years ago when I was getting a divorce and needing to see our ‘marriage’ house sold. Our house was a four level split, two levels developed, about 14 years old at the time we were ready to sell, quite run down (we had not done any upgrading) and we had absolutely no desire to fix it up – not even to put a can of paint to the walls.

We had finished one of the basement levels a short while before we decided to sell, so it was  in relatively “still new” condition at the time we decided to sell, but the house mirrored the breakdown of the relationship and lack of love flowing in the house. In order to just “get er done” we ended up taking the first offer given to us, and only ended up with less than a $20,000 gain over that whole time period. In desperation, people are willing to do and accept many things.

A few years later, I decided to purchase my very own house — my very first house — that belonged to me. It was an older home (late 1950’s), and needed some stuff done, but there had been an addition to it, and it looked actually quite amazing once I redid the floors and had a few other things completed. After spending only about $3,000 in improvements, I sold the house a year later for a $50,000 profit. At that time, I was also in a somewhat desperate situation (I was ill at the time, my financial situation was overwhelming, etc.) yet in this case, I was able to feel good about the outcome, and pay down most of my (remaining) debt as a result. Unfortunately, my financial priorities did not allow me to buy another property, which would have been the best situation, and I did learn a valuable lesson. However, I always feel that everything happens for a reason, and am currently very happy with my life the way it turned out.

I know the mortgage situation is really being talked about a lot lately, since the financial impact hits “home,” literally. We all need to have a roof over our heads, and to feel safe in that space. It should always be our sanctuary.

To your properity,

Sue

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